!!c1QfXUgcGY0

concretization:

Today I learned that the Windows 8 search function is particularly forgiving when it comes to misspellings of Internet Explorer.

Edit: A coworker found that "Inzertet" and "exploper i" also worked, but Krome, Chromee, and Chrone do not work for finding Chrome. Try it yourself.

4:31pm | author:

doom roundup

"Climate change survey suggests axis of denial between GOP, old people"

It’s a good thing that correlation is not causation, or I would worry that old people have chosen the party that tells them they don’t have to worry about climate change, that investments should pay better than work, and that we should cut funding for schools and put off fixing the roads. If I thought that, I would be forced to consider the possibility that today’s seniors care less about the future than any previous generation of Americans.

That would make sense, since when they were young they purported to be the generation that cared least about the past. But all of that is prejudice and assumption; there is little in these poll numbers to indicate that Baby Boomers deny global warming because they won’t have to pay the bill.

Something is drawing them to the GOP, though. The fact remains that of the two major American parties, one of them is constantly urging voters to invest in infrastructure and solutions to future problems, while the other believes the best course is to let everyone keep what they have now. It’s also the one that keeps demanding we take America back.

It’s no coincidence that the Republican Party embraced that message at the same time the largest generation of Americans got old. Quietism, nostalgia, resting on laurels—these are the comforts of age. They also happen to be courses the United States cannot afford to take right now. So it’s kind of unfortunate that they have become reified in the policies of one political party.

"America in Decay: The Sources of Political Dysfunction"

The creation of the U.S. Forest Service at the turn of the twentieth century was the premier example of American state building during the Progressive Era. Prior to the passage of the Pendleton Act in 1883, public offices in the United States had been allocated by political parties on the basis of patronage. The Forest Service, in contrast, was the prototype of a new model of merit-based bureaucracy. It was staffed with university-educated agronomists and foresters chosen on the basis of competence and technical expertise, and its defining struggle was the successful effort by its initial leader, Gifford Pinchot, to secure bureaucratic autonomy and escape routine interference by Congress. At the time, the idea that forestry professionals, rather than politicians, should manage public lands and handle the department’s staffing was revolutionary, but it was vindicated by the service’s impressive performance. Several major academic studies have treated its early decades as a classic case of successful public administration.

Today, however, many regard the Forest Service as a highly dysfunctional bureaucracy performing an outmoded mission with the wrong tools. It is still staffed by professional foresters, many highly dedicated to the agency’s mission, but it has lost a great deal of the autonomy it won under Pinchot. It operates under multiple and often contradictory mandates from Congress and the courts and costs taxpayers a substantial amount of money while achieving questionable aims. The service’s internal decision-making system is often gridlocked, and the high degree of staff morale and cohesion that Pinchot worked so hard to foster has been lost. These days, books are written arguing that the Forest Service ought to be abolished altogether. If the Forest Service’s creation exemplified the development of the modern American state, its decline exemplifies that state’s decay.

"The rise of ‘Obama Inc.’"

Call it “Obama Inc.”

The presidency of Barack Obama has catapulted a network of former advisers into lucrative positions.

Members of the president’s brain trust have steadily moved outside the administration in recent years, capitalizing on their association with the Obama brand to launch careers as advisers, consultants and hired guns.  

“You see people not only serving as representatives of a lobbying firm but taking these very high-profile corporate jobs. I think that is becoming more common,” said Julian Zelizer, a political historian at Princeton University. “Businesses understand that this is a great opportunity for them.”

(previously)

"Are U.S. Markets Liquid and Deep or Rigged and Broken?

The core of the debate centers around the fact that the SEC which oversees stock exchanges has allowed both the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq to create a bifurcated market. The unsophisticated investor is given trading data on which to base trading decisions on a slow data feed called the Securities Information Processor or SIP. The SIP is not only slow in getting the data to the technology-challenged investor, but it has limited data. For the rich and powerful on Wall Street who can afford massive fees, there is another data feed offered by the exchanges called the Direct Feed. The Direct Feed data, which has far more useful information, arrives in the hands of High Frequency Traders and Wall Street’s proprietary traders ahead of the arrival of the SIP data.

This allows the Direct Feed users to buy a stock on the cheap and sell the stock back to the SIP user at a higher price.

At a Senate hearing on June 18, Senator Elizabeth Warren compared the above to the skimming scam depicted in the movie, Office Space. Warren stated:

“For me the term high frequency trading seems wrong. You know this isn’t trading. Traders have good days and bad days. Some days they make good trades and they make lots of money and some days they have bad trades and they lose a lot of money. But high frequency traders have only good days.

“In its recent IPO filing, the high frequency trading firm, Virtu, reported that it had been trading for 1,238 days and it had made money on 1,237 of those days…

“High frequency trading reminds me a little of the scam in Office Space. You know, you take just a little bit of money from every trade in the hope that no one will complain. But taking a little bit of money from zillions of trades adds up to billions of dollars in profits for these high frequency traders and billions of dollars in losses for our retirement funds and our mutual funds and everybody else in the market place. It also means a tilt in the playing field for those who don’t have the information or have the access to the speed or big enough to play in this game.”

The New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq, which also have a mandated regulatory role to ensure that their markets are fair and non-discriminatory, have allowed the two-tiered market to exist because they are collecting hundreds of millions of dollars a year selling the SIP to the dumb money and the Direct Feed to the smart money.

"The Expanding World of Poverty Capitalism"

In Orange County, Calif., the probation department’s “supervised electronic confinement program,” which monitors the movements of low-risk offenders, has been outsourced to a private company, Sentinel Offender Services. The company, by its own account, oversees case management, including breath alcohol and drug-testing services, “all at no cost to county taxpayers.”

Sentinel makes its money by getting the offenders on probation to pay for the company’s services. Charges can range from $35 to $100 a month.

The company boasts of having contracts with more than 200 government agencies, and it takes pride in the “development of offender funded programs where any of our services can be provided at no cost to the agency.”

Sentinel is a part of the expanding universe of poverty capitalism. In this unique sector of the economy, costs of essential government services are shifted to the poor.

In terms of food, housing and other essentials, the cost of being poor has always been exorbitant. Landlords, grocery stores and other commercial enterprises have all found ways to profit from those at the bottom of the ladder.

The recent drive toward privatization of government functions has turned traditional public services into profit-making enterprises as well.

In addition to probation, municipal court systems are also turning collections over to a national network of companies like Sentinel that profit from service charges imposed on the men and women who are under court order to pay fees and fines, including traffic tickets (with the fees being sums tacked on by the court to fund administrative services).

When they cannot pay these assessed fees and fines – plus collection charges imposed by the private companies — offenders can be sent to jail. There are many documented cases in which courts have imprisoned those who failed to keep up with their combined fines, fees and service charges.

"Seniors and the generation spending gap"

At age 89, Larry South would have been forgiven if he had chosen to retire on a sunny beach in Florida. Instead, the former MPP from Kingston, Ont., recently embarked on a political battle to overhaul the municipal property tax system. South had been growing increasingly concerned that elderly homeowners on fixed incomes were struggling to cope with rising property taxes because of the soaring value of their homes, while at the same time he fretted that young workers, with their stagnant wages, were being shut out of the housing market. And so South proposed replacing property taxes with a tax equal to 4.5 per cent of a homeowner’s yearly household income. Doing so would make it easier for young workers to afford the cost of owning a home, while struggling seniors, he believed, would be the biggest beneficiaries.

But in his quest to change the tax system, he has come across an unlikely foe—his elderly friends. Like South, a former engineer who estimates he earns a retirement income that’s 30 to 40 per cent above the $86,000 household average in Kingston, many of his friends also pull in six-figure retirement incomes. Thanks to their high earnings, many would end up paying more in taxes under South’s plan than they do under the existing property tax system. Some, he says, resent the idea of paying more in tax than their younger, lower-income neighbours. “There’s not many that would have an income much less than $100,000, so their taxes will go up,” he says. “But they shouldn’t expect to be subsidized by the poor.”

South’s struggle to reform the property tax system, and the resistance he’s found among his affluent elderly friends, underscores what has been a remarkable shift in the nature of wealth in Canada. Seniors have long been considered society’s most vulnerable citizens, fragile pensioners on fixed incomes in need of a financial helping hand from both government and agile younger workers. That was true decades ago, but not anymore. Thanks to stock market booms, economic growth, a soaring real estate market and a major expansion in both private and government pension plans, today’s seniors are arguably the wealthiest generation in history. The changing fortunes of the elderly have been both swift and profound. In the 1970s, nearly 40 per cent of Canadian seniors lived in poverty. Today it’s five per cent, half the poverty rate of the working-age population and one-third the rate of poverty among children.

Seniors have seen their wealth quadruple since 1984, according to a Bank of Montreal study released last month, far outpacing the growth of wealth among younger Canadians.

5:40pm | author:

From "One Summer: America, 1927" by Bill Bryson.

9:28pm | author:

Do not change your URL for Halloween

c1qfxugcgy0:

Do not change your URL for Halloween.

Do not. Don’t do it.

I know all the cool kids are doing it, and you badly want to make the ten thousandth variation on the spoopy joke, but changing your url is a bad idea. You should think of it as changing your name: something that causes widespread…

Yearly reminder

10:34am | author:

"A Miniaturized Discrete MC1466"

The IC design is pretty archaic. I’d say it dates to the late 1960s. There are fairly ordinary differential amplifiers, but the current mirrors are really strange, and the voltage reference circuit uses Zener diodes and series-connected diodes instead of a temperature compensated bandgap reference. The two Zener diodes (the only round features on the die) are probably just reverse biased NPN transistors, using the ~7.5V avalanche breakdown of the base-emitter junction. The lateral PNPs have a much higher breakdown voltage so they can’t be used this way.

The device is simple enough that I decided to build a really small PC board with discrete components. I found that the BC847BVN (NPN/PNP dual transistor), BC847BV (dual NPN), and BAS16VV (triple diode) came in a really tiny SOT-563 package. Believe it or not, this is not the tightest or smallest layout I’ve done. This is a 2-layer board with 6 mil traces and 6 mil spaces.

8:56pm | author:

Oh no.

Oh no!

Oh no!!

Oh no!!!

4:52pm | author:

For my 26th birthday I deleted my G+ account.

3:34pm | author:
syntaxcoloring:

plaintextoffenders:

sprint.com
Telecommunications
Sprint sends everything you need to take over an account in plaintext: your PIN and security question/answer!



"Gosh why do all these big companies keep getting hacked"

syntaxcoloring:

plaintextoffenders:

sprint.com

Telecommunications

Sprint sends everything you need to take over an account in plaintext: your PIN and security question/answer!

!

"Gosh why do all these big companies keep getting hacked"

9:48am | author:

Anonymous said: you said your birthday is next sat on twitter but you didn't say what your address is?

Thanks for asking this anonymously, so I can’t answer privately.

But it’s cool, you can just send the box of dildos to me at work:

Sam Bierwagen
Robot Mesh
11251 120TH AVE NE STE 217
KIRKLAND WA 98033

Don’t send me a furry pride shirt, though, I already got one for myself.

5:55pm | author:
binary-helix:

rasputinstuff:

montodebon:

nowyoukno:

Sourcefor more facts follow NowYouKno

The key word here is “radioactive”
Do not drive with radiation a few feet in front of you
Do not drive with radiation a few feet in front of you
Also… Do not drive with radiation a few feet in front of you.
This has been a PSA
If you checked the source for information you’d know the radiation it gives off is incredibly weak. It can be stopped with a single sheet of aluminum foil. So unless the engine’s in the passenger seat, you’ll be fine.

Radiation is bad for you in large doses. A lot of things give off small amounts of radiation that won’t hurt you such as phones, TVs, microwaves, computers, etc.

people not understanding radiation and insisting that all radiation ever is unnatural and bad makes me sad. please do your research.

Man oh man do I love Tumblr.
Alright, we’ve got a lot of ground to cover with this one. Go get some coffee.
One of the Critical Life Skills on the internet is the ability to estimate the reputability of a source at a glance. You need to be able to quickly sum up something and decide if it’s nonsensical garbage.
For instance, here’s the header of the “source” that nowyoukno cites:

Hmm.
And here’s a video that tatoott1009 did about the car, if you want to listen to a schizophrenic redneck ramble for half an hour.
A question you might have now, after letting the video play for five seconds and then closing the tab, is “What’s this dude got against the Act of 1871?”
Well, he’ll tell you, by way of an infowars.com article:

“Then, by passing the Act of 1871, Congress formed a corporation known as THE UNITED STATES. This corporation, owned by foreign interests, shoved the organic version of the Constitution aside by changing the word ‘for’ to ‘of’ in the title. Let me explain: the original Constitution drafted by the Founding Fathers read: ‘The Constitution for the united states of America.’ [note that neither the words ‘united’ nor ‘states’ began with capital letters] But the CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA’ is a corporate constitution, which is absolutely NOT the same document you think it is. First of all, it ended all our rights of sovereignty [Sui Juris]. So you now have the HOW, how the international bankers got their hands on THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.”

"International bankers" is the standard dogwhistle phrasing for “jews”, by the way. And look, he’s also discovered the secret behind 9/11! Wow! Is nowyoukno going to do a post about how the Rothschilds did WTC, now, too?
But enough beating on an internet psycho, he’s certainly got enough problems already. I put scare quotes around source up there because this is just a plagiarized copy of a mashable.com article from 2013. It doesn’t have any more information, and doesn’t make any more sense, since mashable is garbage. No, we’ve got to go to the real source: laserpowersystems.com. And what a site it is!

I was having fun writing this post, right up until I started trying to read laserpowersystems.com.
I’ll tell ya, this guy really sincerely believes in his idea, which may or may not be nonsense. I can’t actually tell you what it is though, because he’s apparently terrified to put it down in print, just in case the Rothschilds steal it. It’s got something to do with firing a beam of electrons using a laser wakefield accelerator into a block of thorium, and then… power is produced somehow? Which won’t happen, of course, since that’ll just coat the inside of your vacuum chamber with a film of thorium due to sputtering, and induce some fierce bremsstrahlung x-ray emission, (which certainly won’t be stopped by a sheet of aluminum foil!) but induce no actual fission events…
The mockup graphics all over the site look a lot like RTGs, which:
Can’t put out enough power to run a car (~100W)
Can’t be fueled by thorium
Are super expensive
Depending on the design, have a useful lifetime of only 10-30 years.
Pretty inefficient in their use of fissile materials, much worse than a conventional fission reactor.
This guy is kinda piggybacking on the proposed thorium fuel cycle, a real actual idea which laserpowersystems.com smears by mere association. But, oh well.
As for the people defending radiation in the reblogs above..
Let’s make sure we’re all on the same page:

Radiation is electromagnetic radiation, photons. The farther up the spectrum you go, the more of a punch each individual photon has. When you stand in the sunlight, you’re soaking up thousands of watts of radiation from the giant uncontrolled nuclear reactor our planet orbits. ELF photos are harmless, gamma ray photons are unambiguously dangerous, and kill you. Gamma rays are bad because they’re ionizing radiation: they’re so hot that they smash molecules apart when they smack into them. Ultraviolet light isn’t ionizing radiation, but it still has enough energy to cause photochemical reactions in your skin, and most importantly, your DNA, thus the popularity of skin cancer among baby boomers.
The line at where photochemical effects can definitively said not to happen is wide and fuzzy, and where lots of arguing takes place.
(Any given photochemical effect has a hard threshold beyond which is doesn’t take place: the theory behind this is what Einstein got his first Nobel for in 1921. If a photochemical reaction requires a 420nm photon, then a 430nm photon won’t do anything at all, even if you use millions of watts of them. But while a single reaction is clear and obvious, ruling out all photochemical reactions in a big complex system, like the human body, is hard-bordering-on-impossible.)
(I doubt that cell phone radiation is going to do much of anything that the internal black-body radiation of a warm body isn’t going to do. If our brain proteins are so fragile that they can’t handle 10^11Hz photons, then our own 10^12Hz photons would have cooked them long since.)
So saying that “radiation isn’t bad for you in small doses”[1] is excluding rather a lot of context, isn’t it.
—-
1: I would be remiss if I did not mention the radiation hormesis hypothesis here.

binary-helix:

rasputinstuff:

montodebon:

nowyoukno:

Sourcefor more facts follow NowYouKno

The key word here is “radioactive”

Do not drive with radiation a few feet in front of you

Do not drive with radiation a few feet in front of you

Also… Do not drive with radiation a few feet in front of you.

This has been a PSA

If you checked the source for information you’d know the radiation it gives off is incredibly weak. It can be stopped with a single sheet of aluminum foil. So unless the engine’s in the passenger seat, you’ll be fine.

Radiation is bad for you in large doses. A lot of things give off small amounts of radiation that won’t hurt you such as phones, TVs, microwaves, computers, etc.

people not understanding radiation and insisting that all radiation ever is unnatural and bad makes me sad. please do your research.

Man oh man do I love Tumblr.

Alright, we’ve got a lot of ground to cover with this one. Go get some coffee.

One of the Critical Life Skills on the internet is the ability to estimate the reputability of a source at a glance. You need to be able to quickly sum up something and decide if it’s nonsensical garbage.

For instance, here’s the header of the “source” that nowyoukno cites:

image

Hmm.

And here’s a video that tatoott1009 did about the car, if you want to listen to a schizophrenic redneck ramble for half an hour.

A question you might have now, after letting the video play for five seconds and then closing the tab, is “What’s this dude got against the Act of 1871?”

Well, he’ll tell you, by way of an infowars.com article:

“Then, by passing the Act of 1871, Congress formed a corporation known as THE UNITED STATES. This corporation, owned by foreign interests, shoved the organic version of the Constitution aside by changing the word ‘for’ to ‘of’ in the title. Let me explain: the original Constitution drafted by the Founding Fathers read: ‘The Constitution for the united states of America.’ [note that neither the words ‘united’ nor ‘states’ began with capital letters] But the CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA’ is a corporate constitution, which is absolutely NOT the same document you think it is. First of all, it ended all our rights of sovereignty [Sui Juris]. So you now have the HOW, how the international bankers got their hands on THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.”

"International bankers" is the standard dogwhistle phrasing for “jews”, by the way. And look, he’s also discovered the secret behind 9/11! Wow! Is nowyoukno going to do a post about how the Rothschilds did WTC, now, too?

But enough beating on an internet psycho, he’s certainly got enough problems already. I put scare quotes around source up there because this is just a plagiarized copy of a mashable.com article from 2013. It doesn’t have any more information, and doesn’t make any more sense, since mashable is garbage. No, we’ve got to go to the real source: laserpowersystems.com. And what a site it is!

image

I was having fun writing this post, right up until I started trying to read laserpowersystems.com.

I’ll tell ya, this guy really sincerely believes in his idea, which may or may not be nonsense. I can’t actually tell you what it is though, because he’s apparently terrified to put it down in print, just in case the Rothschilds steal it. It’s got something to do with firing a beam of electrons using a laser wakefield accelerator into a block of thorium, and then… power is produced somehow? Which won’t happen, of course, since that’ll just coat the inside of your vacuum chamber with a film of thorium due to sputtering, and induce some fierce bremsstrahlung x-ray emission, (which certainly won’t be stopped by a sheet of aluminum foil!) but induce no actual fission events…

The mockup graphics all over the site look a lot like RTGs, which:

  1. Can’t put out enough power to run a car (~100W)
  2. Can’t be fueled by thorium
  3. Are super expensive
  4. Depending on the design, have a useful lifetime of only 10-30 years.
  5. Pretty inefficient in their use of fissile materials, much worse than a conventional fission reactor.

This guy is kinda piggybacking on the proposed thorium fuel cycle, a real actual idea which laserpowersystems.com smears by mere association. But, oh well.

As for the people defending radiation in the reblogs above..

Let’s make sure we’re all on the same page:

image

Radiation is electromagnetic radiation, photons. The farther up the spectrum you go, the more of a punch each individual photon has. When you stand in the sunlight, you’re soaking up thousands of watts of radiation from the giant uncontrolled nuclear reactor our planet orbits. ELF photos are harmless, gamma ray photons are unambiguously dangerous, and kill you. Gamma rays are bad because they’re ionizing radiation: they’re so hot that they smash molecules apart when they smack into them. Ultraviolet light isn’t ionizing radiation, but it still has enough energy to cause photochemical reactions in your skin, and most importantly, your DNA, thus the popularity of skin cancer among baby boomers.

The line at where photochemical effects can definitively said not to happen is wide and fuzzy, and where lots of arguing takes place.

(Any given photochemical effect has a hard threshold beyond which is doesn’t take place: the theory behind this is what Einstein got his first Nobel for in 1921. If a photochemical reaction requires a 420nm photon, then a 430nm photon won’t do anything at all, even if you use millions of watts of them. But while a single reaction is clear and obvious, ruling out all photochemical reactions in a big complex system, like the human body, is hard-bordering-on-impossible.)

(I doubt that cell phone radiation is going to do much of anything that the internal black-body radiation of a warm body isn’t going to do. If our brain proteins are so fragile that they can’t handle 10^11Hz photons, then our own 10^12Hz photons would have cooked them long since.)

So saying that “radiation isn’t bad for you in small doses”[1] is excluding rather a lot of context, isn’t it.

—-

1: I would be remiss if I did not mention the radiation hormesis hypothesis here.

(via karloaf)

9:50pm | author:
"Inside a TTL Logic IC"

Since 2014 is generally considered the 50th anniversary of TTL logic, I thought I’d take a TTL logic chip apart and do a little analysis.
So I started with a DM7438N, lot code M:P9006Y. Looking at National Semiconductor’s device marking convention document, I take this to mean that it was manufactured in week 6 of 1990 at a subcontractor’s fab in the United States and assembled in Malaysia.
The 7438 is a quad 2-input NAND buffer with open-collector outputs. That means the die should look symmetrical to a degree.
To take it apart, I used a rotary tool to carve out the encapsulation material on the top and the bottom, and then picked at it with side cutters until the chip fell out. Sadly I cracked off a corner of the die including one bond pad, but it’s still possible to figure out how it works.
[…]

"Inside a TTL Logic IC"

Since 2014 is generally considered the 50th anniversary of TTL logic, I thought I’d take a TTL logic chip apart and do a little analysis.

So I started with a DM7438N, lot code M:P9006Y. Looking at National Semiconductor’s device marking convention document, I take this to mean that it was manufactured in week 6 of 1990 at a subcontractor’s fab in the United States and assembled in Malaysia.

The 7438 is a quad 2-input NAND buffer with open-collector outputs. That means the die should look symmetrical to a degree.

To take it apart, I used a rotary tool to carve out the encapsulation material on the top and the bottom, and then picked at it with side cutters until the chip fell out. Sadly I cracked off a corner of the die including one bond pad, but it’s still possible to figure out how it works.

[…]

9:02pm | author:

zarla-s:

thanks for the worst hoodie in the entire world c1qfxugcgy0, i will wear it never

Happy birthday!

6:45am | author:

Tumblr is going to scan your photos for the brand logos they contain

deckerantagonist:

And then sell that information to the corporations who own the brands.

Investor storytime in action.

(via webinarfantastic)

6:10pm | author:
foldingcookie replied to your post:reviews 5
I was also an adherent of the propaganda/garbage dichotomy but then after reading tor.com/stories… I realized it had been written by Doctorow and I was hella baffled

Huh, that’s not bad. I’m getting the feeling that Cory got halfway through it before realizing that he was going to have to write an ending, though.

Spoilers: Vs jr jrer fhccbfrq gb oryvrir gung Yrba, nqiregvfvat nppbhag rkrphgvir, jnf nyfb n cunezprhgvpny purzvfg jub znantrq gb trg n cflpuvngevp zrqvpngvba nyy gur jnl vagb pyvavpny gevnyf, gura znantr gb xvyy gur qeht fb rssrpgviryl gung yvgrenyyl abobql ryfr va gur jbeyq rira unq n pbcl bs gur zbyrphyne fgehpgher; gura ur ernyyl arrqrq gb fcraq zber gvzr frggvat gung hc rneyvre va gur fgbel, engure guna fcevatvat vg ba hf ng gur raq.

8:01pm | author:

There is no satire as awful as reality itself.

(From The Path Between the Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914 by David McCullough)

(Source: Wikipedia)

7:50pm | author: